Impact

Impact

AfricaRice continues to implement strategic upstream research and capacity-development activities, while proactively linking with development partners to scale out rice technologies to generate outcomes and impact following its theory of change.

 

AfricaRice has developed improved rice technologies, practices and tools that have been tried and used by smallholder rice farmers in Africa. It has also established various impact-enhancing mechanisms such as the task forces, the rice hubs and the innovation platforms (IPs).

 

Through its R4D activities, AfricaRice in close association with its partners, is contributing significantly to poverty alleviation and food security in the continent as highlighted below.

 

 

Impact of NERICA rice varieties in Africa: millions lifted out of poverty and food insecurity  (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2211912416300700?via%3Dihub)

 

(https://www.cgiar.org/news-events/news/in-a-grain-of-rice-solutions-for-poverty-and-hunger-in-sub-saharan-africa/)

 

Highlights

  • Thanks to adoption of NERICA rice varieties, developed by AfricaRice, 8 million people in Africa lifted out of poverty and food insecurity in 16 African countries

  • Average income increased from US$ 25 per capita to US$ 58 capita per capita for NERICA adopters.

  • Adoption of improved rice varieties was more significant after the 2008 food crisis.

  • Households given training and NERICA seeds saw a 23% increase in yield

Abstract

The dissemination of improved rice varieties could contribute significantly to achieving food security and reducing poverty in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). This study assesses the number of households and individuals lifted out of poverty and food insecurity. Metadata and primary data collected from sixteen countries were analyzed. A positive impact of improved varieties on food security and poverty reduction was observed over the period 2000–2014. In addition, the rate of adoption of these varieties increased over these years and this increase was more significant after the 2008 food crisis. Average income also increased from US$ 25 per capita to US$ 58 per capita for NERICA adopters. These trends could be enhanced by addressing production constraints and certified seed bottlenecks.

 

 

Impact of Smart-valleys approach in West Africa

(https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-77878-5_11)

Highlights

  • Adoption of Smart-valleys technology, finetuned by AfricaRice, enables producers to increase the yield by 0.9 t/ha and the net income by US$ 267/ha.

  • The food consumption score indicates that adoption of Smart-valleys technology helps women to increase food security more compared to men.

  • Widescale diffusion of and direct training of individual farmers on the approach would help smallholder rice farmers to adapt to the climate change and improve their livelihoods.

Abstract

Low productivity is the main characteristic of agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa. Adverse effects of climate change increasingly reduce both productivity and production. Rice plays an important role in the food security of population. However, rice production faces many constraints, including low water control and soil fertility management. In order to improve water control and soil management and increase the productivity of local rice production in the context of climate change, a new technology (Smart-valleys approach) was introduced in Benin and Togo since 2010. The aim of this study is to assess the adoption, the diffusion and impact of smart-valley approach. Data were collected from 590 rice farming households in Benin and Togo. Results revealed that land tenure, total available area, paddy price and production in the lowland increase the adoption of Smart-valleys approach. Adoption of Smart-valleys approach increased from 110 ha in 2012 to 474 ha in 2014. In addition, the adoption enables producers to increase the yield by 0.9 t/ha, the net income by US$ 267/ha under the condition of climate change. The study suggests that large diffusion and training on the technology would help for adaptation to climate change and improving their livelihood of smallholder rice farmers.

 

 

Impact of WITA 9, lowland rice variety, in Cote d’Ivoire

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1343943X.2019.1667834

Highlights

  • Study shows paddy yield advantage of the WITA 9 variety, developed by AfricaRice, is 0.7 t/ha

  • Its adoption increased farmer’s income by US$ 91/ha/season

  • Consumers’ willingness to pay was higher for WITA 9 than for any other locally produced rice variety and comparable to imported rice in one of two local markets

Abstract

Information on comprehensive evaluation of agricultural innovations is often limited. This study provides an overview of multidisciplinary evaluation of a lowland rice variety, WITA 9 (released in Côte d’Ivoire in 1998), with respect to its agronomic performance, grain quality, resistance to diseases, adoption by farmers, impact on productivity and farmers’ income, and marketability. WITA 9 had the highest paddy yield among the tested varieties including an international check (IR 64) and recently developed varieties adapted to this country. WITA 9 had a higher amylose content (26–28%) than others tested. This study confirmed its resistance to bacterial leaf blight, Rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV), and rice blast. A household survey showed that the adoption rate was 24%, its paddy yield advantage was 0.7 t/ha, and its adoption increased farmer’s income by US$ 91/ha/season. A market study showed that consumers’ willingness to pay was higher for WITA 9 than any other locally produced rice variety and comparable to imported rice in one of two markets. We conclude that WITA 9 is an ideal innovation for enhancing productivity and rice import substitution in Côte d’Ivoire. An effective seed delivery system and enhancing farmers’ and consumers’ awareness of this variety are vital for accelerating impact.

 

 

Impact of RiceAdvice app in Nigeria

(Article in press)

Highlights

  • The RiceAdvice app, developed by AfricaRice, provides personalized advice on rice management practices

  • RiceAdvice increased yield by about 0.55 t/ha and profitability by about US$ 250/ha.

  • Farmers receiving recommendations from RiceAdvice generally applied more urea and less NPK compound fertilizer.

  • Farmers attributed three main advantages to RiceAdvice: increased yield, increased income and reduced use of fertilizer

Summary

Poor fertilizer management practices in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) have resulted in soil nutrient depletion, and consequently caused soil degradation. RiceAdvice is an innovation for SSA’s smallholders, who had earlier access to blanket fertilizer recommendations, which were not useful for them. The RiceAdvice app provides personalized advice on rice management practices. An impact assessment in Nigeria (in press) showed that RiceAdvice increased yield by about 0.55 t/ha and profitability by about US$ 250/ha. Farmers taking up RiceAdvice used more urea (nitrogen-only fertilizer) and less compound (nitrogen–phosphate–potassium) fertilizer. Some 80% of the farmers attributed three main advantages to RiceAdvice: increased yield, increased income and reduced use of fertilizer. This suggests that RiceAdvice offers a promising avenue for increasing rice yield, production and profitability in SSA.

 

 

Impact of GEM rice parboiling technology in Benin

(Source: AfricaRice annual reports and impact posters)

Highlights

  • With GEM technology, processors can get a profit of US $392 for every ton of rice parboiled compared to parboilers using other parboiling systems.

  • It reduces expenditure on firewood from US$ 1.83 to 0.64 per 100 kg of paddy parboiled.

  • It also reduces the steaming time from about 60—90 min to 20—25 min per 100 kg of paddy.

Summary

The GEM (Grain quality enhancer, Energy-efficient and durable Material) improved rice-parboiling technology, developed by AfricaRice, produces quality rice, processes large quantities of rice relatively quickly, is energy efficient, and safer to operate than traditional methods — particularly for female and younger processors. With GEM technology, processors can get a profit of US$ 392 for every ton of rice parboiled compared to parboilers using the traditional system. It reduces expenditure on firewood from US$ 1.83 to 0.64 per 100 kg of paddy parboiled. It also reduces the steaming time from about 60—90 min to 20—25 min per 100 kg of paddy.

 

 

Effect of ASI thresher in Benin

(http://www.journalcra.com/article/effect-use-anaxial-flow-thresher-cleaner-asi-threshing-cleaning-effectiveness-and-rice)

Highlights

  • The hourly capacity (kg/h) of the ASI axial flow thresher-cleaner, developed by AfricaRice, is 1780.5 kg/h or 445.05 kg/person/h compared to 129.14 kg/h or 32.29 kg/person/h for the farmer’s practice using barrel.

  • The percentage of the losses at threshing is 4.13% for traditional threshing practice against 0.14% for the ASI thresher-cleaner.

  • ASI thresher is highly appreciated by rice producers because it does not significantly alter farmers’ practices, gives clean paddy and significantly reduces the broken grain rate which is a key factor affecting rice quality in Benin.

Abstract

Production activities and rice processing are done in Benin with inefficient and strenuous traditional technologies. Bad threshing operation in Benin affects the quality of rice. This study aims at evaluating the technical and technological performances of the ASI axial flow thresher-cleaner in farmer’s field. The improved method with the thresher-cleaner and farmer’s practice using barrel have been tested in the real conditions of rice harvesting and threshing in Benin. Indicators of technical and technological performances (Hourly capacity, impurities percentage, threshing losses) reveal that the ASI thresher-cleaner has better results compared to the farmer’s practice using barrel. Results showed that the hourly capacity (kg/h) of the axial flow thresher-cleaner is 1780.5 kg/h or 445.05 kg/person/h compared to 129.14 kg/h or 32.29 kg/person/h for the farmer’s practice using barrel. The percentage of the losses at threshing is 4.13%for traditional threshing practice against 0.14% for the ASI thresher-cleaner. The germination percentage of rice grains is 79.38% for the threshing on barrel versus 89.47% for the thresher-cleaner. It emerges from this study that the ASI thresher-cleaner has a high-performance and allows producers to save time by reducing the work hardness compared to the traditional method. Moreover, this machine is highly appreciated by rice producers because it does not significantly alter farmer’s practices, gives clean paddy and significantly reduces the broken rate which is a key factor affecting rice quality in Benin. This thresher-cleaner can be used in seed production.

 

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